Looking for rare wildlife


Seems I have been on the missing list. Actually I have been a little busy donating time to a science based National mental health initiative that is to be launched soon. They are a fascinating group of people with training solutions for workplace bullying. I donated some time helping with their websites and learned a lot about how basically the way we treat each other can, and does, make people sick. I found it interesting that every time I hear about bullying it is someone else 'identifying the problems'. I liked this mob because they actually seem to have some solutions... I only mentioned it because having finished I have had the time and opportunity with a couple of friend's to stakeout an area of Namadgi and look for a little rare wildlife.

There are species in the A.C.T that haven't had an official sighting in 20 and 30 years, Quolls and Smoky Mice for example. There are others that haven't been seen in so long that they are officially declared extinct. I'm looking for those 'quasi-extinct' species with such a low population that they are rarely if ever seen.

Why? because it interests me and its a great reason to keep fit and healthy in the bush. For the first time I wore a front facing harness video that ran for an hour. The first part of this video is 6 minutes of commentary as we went along from audio/video footage taken when selecting a location and setting equipment. The second half is real camera footage of the finished set up. I have a theory that if you never ever go... you will never ever know.

   

The camera is set on time lapse and will take 1 photo every 10 seconds for 24 hours. So 6 per minute. That should equate to  8640 photos - I have software that plays the photos like a movie to detect targets. Two sound recorders will capture any accompanying unusual animal sounds. Who know's maybe I'll get something... maybe I won't, but it was a beautiful day.

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